KNAPPLE

Today we are Featuring Norwich based Mural Artist KNAPPLE, who came to our attention this year during the height of the BLM Protests due to one of their murals…

Keep reading to find out more!

Q1: What is your Name, Age, and Where are you based?

A: I’m Knapple, I’m 42 and I’m currently based in Norwich.

Q2: How did you first get into your creative practice/ work?

A: I chose art as a career because as my children got older I wanted to show them you could carve your own path, plus I really felt I needed a creative outlet so I enrolled on a BTEC course at Wensum Lodge and then a foundation degree just to get myself started with some techniques.

Q3: Are there any main or overarching themes you explore in your work?

A: My main focus throughout my art is positivity but with a hint of wit, self help and the power of thought. People don’t realise how much creative power our minds have and I want to show that change first comes from within. I’ve also started to explore human rights issues.

Q4: Highlight one of your biggest inspirations!

A: My biggest inspiration is Keith Haring, when I saw his work in the Liverpool Tate last year I could feel a powerful energy emanating from them, he did activism so perfectly. 

Q5: Where can you see yourself in 5 years’ time?

A: In 5 years time I expect to be living in or nearer to London and to be running Youth Mural projects, empowering and inspiring the next generation is my aim in life, so many inner city kids are ignored by society and I want to help give them a voice!

One Campaign KNAPPLE supports is ‘The Black Curriculum’ which is a Campaign ‘founded in 2019 by young people to address the lack of Black British history in the UK Curriculum. We believe that by delivering arts focused Black history programmes, providing teacher training and campaigning through mobilising young people, we can facilitate social change.’

You can visit their website to learn more and support this campaign! https://www.theblackcurriculum.com

You can also learn more about KNAPPLE’s BLM Mural in Norwich here… https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-norfolk-52959560/black-lives-matter-norwich-artist-ruth-knapp-repaints-defaced-mural

And follow them at their Instagram!

THANKS FOR READING- SEE YOU AGAIN SOON

BLM Protest in Cornwall- Ellice March.

First on BLM Week at the OP we are in conversation with one of the Organisers of the BLM Protest in Truro, Cornwall on the 15th of Jue 2020. Ellice Marsh.

Keep reading to find out more about the Day off the Protest+ how it effected her community…

Q1: What is your name, age and where are you from?

A:  Ellice Marsh//Redruth, Cornwall//19 (18 at the time of the protest).

Q2: What made you want to organise the BLM protest in your community?

A: I was+am so tired by the amount of racism and hatred in Cornwall, and I wanted to let the black people in the community know that there are lots of us that care and will stand up for them!

Q3: What was the most difficult aspect of organising the protest?

A: The hardest part was probably ensuring that everything was safe and social distanced as COVID-19 is obviously still a huge issue, but we managed to keep everyone 2m apart and still have over 1500 people attend!

Q4: What was the most rewarding moment?

A: The most rewarding moments were just letting black people in the community speak and share their experiences and witness their pain and raw emotion, and to hear their thanks for organising the protest, I really felt like I was helping people!

Q5: Has anything come from the protest/ had a lasting effect on your community?

A: More people in the community have shared their experiences with racism and exposed how much it happens in Cornwall, people have also contacted local schools etc and spoke to them about educating kids on the true history of the British empire and racism in Britain!

Q6: Do you have any tips for others wanting to organise their own BLM ( or other) Protest?

A: In terms of tips for organising, make sure there’s a small team of you as it’s a lot of work on your own, consider risk assessments and every possibility or things that could go wrong to make sure everyone is as safe as possible, and just gaining as much support as possible from local MP’s and people in positions of power, also contacting and cooperating with local news stations too!

For example I did an interview for bbc radio Cornwall, and for ITV westcountry (and was actually on tv which was crazy) but we got loads of great coverage and proved how much people care about Black lives matter!

To read another article about the event you can visit ‘Cornwall Live’ ! And also find other local BLM Protest on Facebook Events! OR ORGANISE YOUR OWN!

-THANKS FOR READING-

-BLACK LIVES MATTER-

We are Dedicating this week on The Orange Peel Blog to the Black Lives Matter movement.

Although the global media may not be covering the Real Life protesting and violence which is still occurring around the world, RACISM is still a Global issue that needs to be tackled. So this week we are sharing content from U.K based Artists and Activists who have produced work around the BLM movement or helped promote the message and tackle Racism in their own way.

Daisy ( OP Co-Creator) has created a series of ‘Black Lives Matter’ Badges+ Patches which are available to anyone who has donated to the BLM cause/ anyone who would like to purchase them!

Just message her at her Instagram- @_daisynell_

Patches by Daisy Nell.

And if you would still like to support the Movement/ Donate to a good cause visit https://blacklivesmatter.com for all the resources you would need!

‘A surge of power (Jen Reid)’ 2020- Bristol. by Marc Quinn.
A Good Boi

-Stay tuned this week for more BLM content+ Remember to check your Privilege-

James Greenhalgh

Seeing us into the new month of July is a fresh Artist Feature with London based photographer James Greenhalgh!

Keep Reading to find out more about his work based around Identity and Masculinity and creative inspirations…

Q1: What is your Name, Age, and Where are you based?

A: I’m James Greenhalgh, 21 and I’m based in London.

Q2: How did you first get into your creative practice/ work?

A: I first got into photography by total mistake. I had never studied anything creative at school and I thought I was going to be a computer scientist. I had to pick my A-Levels and one of the subjects I selected (Anthropology) was removed from the curriculum because not enough people picked the subject so I was pulled into my head of year’s office to quickly pick another random subject. I selected photography as I thought it might be a cool skill to learn but I thought I was going to focus on my more academic subjects. My teachers then introduced me to artists such as Wolfgang Tillmans and Nan Goldin; suddenly I saw how photography was able to communicate emotions, stories, and people’s experiences in a way that words can’t achieve. From there I started working on how I could use photography to capture my own identity and the people around me.

Q3: Are there any main or overarching themes you explore in your work?

A: My work explores my identity, in particular, how the way men challenge and express their masculinity has changed as we grow up in a generation where identity expression is more fluid and the traditional archetype of ‘Man’ is developing.

Q4: How has the COVID- 19 Pandemic affected your work?

A: COVID-19 has resulted in my graduation show being massively altered, final major university project being rushed to completion, and job prospects being put on hold indefinitely or canceled. I’ve taken this time to look back over my archive and reflect on what I’ve been creating, I’ve done a couple shoots over video call but for the most part, I just can’t wait to get back into the studio and creating work again.

Q5: Highlight one of your biggest inspirations!

A: David Armstrong: I was introduced to David’s work really late in my university degree and I only wish I found his work earlier. His portraits of people he encountered in his life (friends, lovers, and even acquaintances who left an impact on him) are so simplistic but through them, you start to see the life of David come through the images. He was also Nan Goldin’s flatmate for a long time (who’s work really inspired me when I was younger) and it was super interesting to research how they collaborated on different projects as their photographs tell similar stories of identity expression through other people.

Q6: Where can you see yourself in 5 years’ time?

A: In 5 years time, I hope to be working with amazing designers, stylists, artists and models for magazines and fashion campaigns. I’m currently working for other photographers and hope to follow in their footsteps.

Q7: If you could share a message with the world, what would it be?

A: Please listen to your Black friends when they share their experiences of racism, don’t argue, just listen. If you need a place to start your research into racial inequality, read “Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race” by Reni Eddo-Lodge or “White Fragility” by Robin DiAngelo or if you need a short book to get you started, read “Dark Days” by James Baldwin. Black Lives Matter.

To see more of James’ amazing photography work visit his website… james-greenhalgh.com

Or Instagram ! Where there is also a link to his BA Degree show!

Thankyou So Much For Reading, see you again soon…